The Comparison Factor

Firstly I’d like to introduce a good friend of mine called Oliver Campey who runs ‘olliecampey.com‘. We got our heads together late last year and have decided to get started with a series of social media related blogs/vlogs. Our first blog will focus on the perception vs reality aspect of social media and the comparison factor and you can find Ollie’s written analysis with his thoughts embedded below.

In an age where social media has intertwined itself with almost every aspect of our daily lives, it would be fair to assume that as a population we have acclimatised fairly well to the psychological challenges that come with opening up our world to the public.

The use of social media grew at a far faster rate than anyone could’ve ever predicted and not just from a personal perspective, in business too, social media has now become one of the most powerful tools for marketing your products, creating customer engagement and promoting your brand. There is no doubt that the birth of Social Media has introduced some incredible platforms into the world

Instagram – Being able to visually present your life to the world has put everyone back in touch with their inner creative (optimisation tips available here)

Facebook – Being able to connect with friends you’ve met around the world so you don’t lose touch and share all types of content

YouTube – A platform for masses to create, absorb and share video content
And these are just a few examples…

However, whilst Social Media continues to develop and we continue to improve at marketing our personal and professional journeys there is a much darker side to the all of this. I feel it’s important that it’s brought to the surface so that younger generations can develop the correct coping mechanisms for dealing with the negative implications that can arise when Social Media is misinterpreted or misunderstood.

One of the most widely talked about side effects of Social Media is the ‘comparison factor’. Particularly amongst people in their early teens, the upward comparisons being made against content posted by they’re friends/peers is leading to a reduction in self-esteem, higher levels of jealousy and in turn higher levels of depression amongst teenagers.

However, the problems run much deeper than this and only now are we beginning to see more and more cases of the vicious circle that is consuming many young people in society. The ‘comparison factor’ can often be the trigger point that sets off the cycle of negative thoughts although there are many other reasons and external circumstances which can influence the mood of a person when engaging with Social Media.

One of the biggest issues is a chemical called dopamine, often referred to as the chemical behind all of our sins and secret cravings. In it’s simplest form dopamine is a chemical that acts as a messenger between brain cells and is responsible for things such as movement and speech.

However, it also plays a role in addiction due to the heightened sense of satisfaction we receive when the brain receives a so-called ‘fix’. You see it most amongst smokers (nicotine), alcoholics (alcohol) and gambling, now it’s beginning to take effect on Social Media too, particularly when people receive a ‘like’ or positive comment. It’s been proven amongst various research articles that dopamine triggers the ‘reward molecule’ in our brain and this okay for people who live with a very low level of stress and in broader terms are on good terms with the way their life is being played out.

Where the problem needs addressing is amongst people who suffer from depression, sadness, mental trauma or even temporary stints of unhappiness. The reason being is that people are turning to Social Media to get the ‘likes’ which as we know triggers the reward system in our brain leading to a feel-good factor. As we are aware with the other types of addiction, if this is prolonged over a period of time then the reaction becomes hard-wired in our brains and lo and behold forms an addiction.

It becomes a double-edged sword on many levels. The craving to get the likes/comments places extreme amounts of pressure on people to find content that will generate that type of engagement and when they can’t achieve this a sense of unfulfillment and sadness sets in. It’s also acting as a temporary fix and so the next day it becomes a repeat process meaning people are never actually learning to deal with the root of what’s causing them to feel sad, they’re only ever masking the problems and making their life seem something it’s not to the outside world.

This is extremely dangerous because to their friends, family, employers, it will seem as if everything is great and therefore they can’t offer the kind of support and advice that is needed to help nurture them through the period of negative thinking.

When we think about someone’s life and how they’re getting on, we tend to scan their social media and from the outside everything often looks great. The pictures of nights out with friends, sunny holidays, smiley selfies but in reality on the inside it can often be a very different picture.

To conclude, there is no doubt that social media can have an extremely positive effect on both our personal and professional journeys. There does, however, need to be a greater understanding amongst society about the negative implications that come with prolonged usage and most importantly how we deal with that.

Love on social media

In this new age of social media, can relationships be what they used to be? Can you love someone unconditionally without showing the world how much you love someone? Of course you can but there are people who choose to document their relationship online for the whole world to see?

Getting more “likes” or more “views” or simply just more engagement has become far more important to people than many other meaningful things that we could label as meaningful only a few years ago. We are now seeing people share the most intimate part of their lives as a show to gain an audience and a following to ultimately gain a more monetary status. This is more than a reality TV show, this is reacting to people, demanding to see the ins and outs of the life you live.

But is this really a meaningful relationship? Is sharing every facet of your life keeping your relationship together? If it is… Is that true love?

Trends and social stigmas

We’re living in a life full of trends and what I like to call “the new age of peer pressure.” We’re now more so than ever trying to fit in with our social crowd and doing things that we would have never thought about doing five, ten or even fifteen years ago.

Let’s look at tattoos, gluten free or even veganism and try and understand how and why these have become social trends. Yes, people are educating themselves and become more “open” about such things but people are also seeking a way to become a part of a social setting that where they can “fit in.” With the rise of social and digital media, information is much easier to grasp that in the 90s and we’re being taught or some may say “brainwashed” into following trends unconsciously.

But maybe there’s a point to that…

Will our children’s, children’s, children require intimate human interaction and companionship?

It’s hard to believe that several generations down the line of present day won’t require human companionship the way we do today. In some instances, it becomes difficult to wrap our heads around the idea that going out with friends on a Friday afternoon after work to grab a few drinks won’t exist. Or having a general face-to-face catch up with good friends will simply always result to a mode of communication through technology.

In a way, humans will always need the companionship of other humans at least for the purpose of reproduction. But thinks again, do we actually need ‘companionship’ to create other beings, no… We don’t!

The way young people use their mobile devices today is a very obvious example of the direction that mobile technology and technology in general is moving. Who’s to say that in one hundred years from now, Rebecca and Jill will be communicating by hologram devices instead of meeting at each other’s houses to gossip?

There used to be a time when you had to physically talk to someone in front of their face in order to communicate with them. Now, all we need to do is pick up a phone. The more we develop as a race and create new ways of talking to one another, the less actual human physical interaction we’ll need. We will no longer need that level of intimate human interaction or companionship.

Yes, communicating with a friend in any circumstance or by any means is still companionship but compare this companionship to what we have today. Now ask yourself this question… What comes next after holograms?

Are video games a reality?

Video games have become a way of life for many people; young and old. They become so engrossed into digital entertainment that it has turned into a form of reality that is becoming increasingly difficult to step away from.

With the advancement in video game play and the tools that have allowed video gaming to become more ‘realistic’, we are now living in an age that can literally put us into games.

Take VR for example, a tool that allows people to live within a simulation or an event, or a game. This is the beginning of a world where we will no longer rely on the control pad to control our sword-wielding character but yet we will soon be able to use actions and thoughts to defeat the flame throwing nemesis that confronts us.

We live in a time where Egaming has blown up on a massive scale with a large influx of money that has been pumped into the industry. This has attracted a wave of gamers with a hunger to ‘make it big’, knowing that they have potential for fame and riches. In some territories across the world, especially South East Asia, it is not uncommon for gamers to where diapers while gaming. Why? So that they don’t lose points while taking a bathroom break. It is also not uncommon for these gamers to be fed while playing. Why? For the same reason.

These video games have now become a reality.

But there are two stories here and I want to ask the same question again. This time, with a twist.

Michio Kaku is an American theoretical physicist who has a lot to do with the way I think about things. He once questioned human life as potentially a ‘simulation.’ Think about that for a second.

Us humans have even created a video game that goes by the name of… ‘The Sims.’ A game where you can create humans inside of a simulation… I want to end by asking you one final question.

Why can’t we humans also be living in a simulation, being controlled by external beings?

The Immense Power of Internet Memes

Everybody loves to be entertained. There is no one person on this planet that does not enjoy a ‘good old chuckle.’

As generations go by and people start to urge for their ‘fix’ of entertainment and laughter – we start to see a curtain being lifted on extremism and what people will do to get their enjoyment.

People like change, people like to want to “see what happens.”

I’ve heard people say: “I voted for Trump to shake things up a bit”, “I voted Brexit just because.”

This is the culture that many young people live in today. Sometimes it can be for the worse, sometimes it can be for the better.

We live in a meme culture, whereby what we see online, on our Instagram feeds, on our Facebook timeline, etc, dictates the way we feel about certain topics.

Think to yourself for a minute.

How many Trump memes did we see during his US presidential campaign?

Now think to yourself again.

How many Clinton memes did you see during her US presidential campaign?

Entertainment through memes and other types of internet influences creates a new wave of pop culture that in-turn is directly, but mostly indirectly used as a marketing ploy.

From my personal experience, Donald Trump was the one that was continuously ridiculed and ‘laughed at’ through memes on my social media timelines… I rarely saw a Hilary Clinton meme.

People were able to make fun of Trump and laugh at Trump. Over time, this would have had people think:

“Wouldn’t it be funny if he actually became the 45th President of the United States of America?”

“Maybe I should vote for him to see what he does?” “Maybe I should vote for him to see what happens?”

The current US President was so heavily marketed in a way through memes and pop culture that he was always talked about and always in our line of sight without us knowing that he was being sold to us.

Of course, what we saw of Mr Trump in the media spotlight was not always a shining, glamorous example of what a leader of any nation should resemble.

BUT.

Publicity, no matter if it’s bad publicity – is always publicity.

That being said, meme culture has created a pathway for brands and companies to start to market their products and create content that can entice their younger, more ‘connected’ audience.

The power of a good meme should not be underestimated. It has the ability to enhance the ordinary into the extraordinary. Just ask the US President.

So… How can brands use memes to turn products viral?

That is the skills we all need to master.